CEO and average worker pay gap reporting launches

Keely explains what you need to know and what you should do in light of the new pay gap regulation that comes into force in January 2019 and why you should start collating data now.

In Keely Rushmore’s article for HR Magazine, she explores the CEO and average worker pay gap regulations and examines what HR teams need to know about the changes that come into force in January 2019, as well as what they should do about it.

What you should know about CEO and Average worker pay gap regulations:

In January 2019 new legislation comes into force requiring companies with more than 250 employees to publish their executive pay gap, although the first reports are not expected until 2020.

The plans come as part of the government’s push to reform corporate governance.

It may feel like there is a long time before the results need to be published; as it only applies to companies whose financial year begins from 1st January; but employers could do a test run on their January 2018 figures, as this will give them a good idea if they have the data they need.

It remains to be seen whether reporting will affect any changes in behaviour, but there has been a change where the government is forcing more transparency, as we’ve seen with the gender pay gap reporting. If you’re forced to look at your figures, and understand the reasons behind them, then companies will start to address these problems. But it will be a process.

To find out more about the CEO and Average worker pay gap regulations and what HR teams should do to prepare, read the January 2019 edition of HR Magazine. 

CONTACT KEELY

If you would like more information or advice relating to this article or an Employment law matter, please do not hesitate to contact Keely Rushmore on 01727 798046 

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